The Malady Of Blind Morality.

Two nights ago, the fifth season of the popular TV series, Game Of Thrones came to an end. The final episode reflected arguably more than any other episode the theme of the series; deaths, disasters, thick plotting any time. Well, this isn’t about a series review in case you’re wondering.

In the season finale, we see Jon Snow, eyes wide open, face up, blood seeping into the the thick white snow as the life ebbed slowly out of him. He had been stabbed about 5 or 6 times by members of the night watch of which he was the commander. I think they call this mutiny.

In the episode preceeding the last, the mother of dragons had to be whisked away by her dragon as a section of the people she governed sought to take her life. She wasn’t a bad leader, infact, she tried so hard to do all the right things; rule with fairness and justice, and punish wrongdoers, but things went horribly awry and she would have suffered the same fate Jon Snow did suffer.

Again, in the final episode, Arya Stark, daughter of Ned Stark, who had been earlier beheaded in one of the past seasons lost her eyesight because against the wishes of those she was doing apprenticeship with, she killed a man well deserving of death.

These three characters in the grand scheme of things didn’t really do wrong. Infact, they tried so hard to enforce Justice in their dealings, yet, tragedy struck.

Why did bad things happen to these ‘good people’ trying to do ‘good things’? Simple. They weren’t very observant/attentive to the people in their immediate environments. Jon Snow neglected the growing discontent amongst his people as he sought to provide a safe haven for the wildlings; their sworn enemies. The mother of dragons almost always took ONLY her own counsel of swift judgment, neglected the pleas for mercy and diplomacy in leadership. Arya Stark refused to bide her time properly in ‘judging’ past offenders.

They all paid a price. A steep price.

More often than not, people have good intentions, then they “go to work” without properly considering the folks their efforts and decisions affect in some way. They believe morality to be enough reason for every man to reason with them. You see, in the real world, things do not always work that way. Every good intention must be effected with wisdom and a keen observation of the ‘climate’ of those in the immediate ‘environment.’

If only we did weigh the costs carefully, if only we did attend to the concerns of our subjects and contemporaries alike on our endeavors, if only we embraced the fact that things shouldn’t always be treated purely BLACK or WHITE, perhaps, just perhaps we won’t have a lot of the obstacles that plague our progress in our many endeavors.

This resonates still with one of the points in my scrabble roundup yesterday; being observant wins.

I wish you the kind of day you deserve; let Karma sort this out!

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1 Comment

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One response to “The Malady Of Blind Morality.

  1. Oluwatobi Adeosun

    Well written piece. Being observant truly wins most times. However, if all we wait on are the way people feel about things, we will hardly ever get things done. Jon Snow was doing stuff for the greater good- they need(ed) the wildlings to fight against the whitewalkers and even if he didn’t die now, he might have died at the hands of whitewalkers and been one of them eventually. I will use a typical example of Fashola in Lagos state. A large percentage of people were against banning okkdadas all together and clearing the markets but he did it all the same and people now commend it for it. Nothing Daenerys could have done would have been appropriate in the eyes of the former masters. They just would not be subject to her. In the end, even knowing all the odds, we still have to make our decision and pay the price for it. Better that, than living without living. PS: I wish I did all the things I just wrote. Lol

    Like

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